16

Re: Little Things that Make a Difference

I have a couple observations and suggestions I'd like to toss into the mix here, if I may.

Walking the walk, first and foremost, usually (though, not necessarily) means learning to think and live "outside of the box." Yet a few of the well-intended suggestions, as well as excuses, I'm seeing here so far are more akin to merely rearranging the furniture.

For instance, there's a suggestion to shop with coupons and select items offering rebates to save money. Okay - on the surface, that might seem like a good idea, but is it really? Think about it. Have you ever seen anything (food-wise) being offered on a coupon that you actually feel good about putting into your body? Fact is, it's always some sort of chemical-laden over-processed garbage that, in addition to being something you really don't need in the first place, should be avoided at all cost. And who offers these enticements, anyway? Yeah, that's right - the big conglomerate "food" (and I use that term very loosely) factories and their bought-and-paid-for outlets. Are the small "mom and pop" markets really any better? Yeah, sometimes. But many if not most of them get their inventory from pretty much the same distributors that the big chains do. They just don't get the same wholesale rate, and so aren't able to compete and are eventually forced out of business.

A solution? Avoid supermarkets and buy organic, or at the very least, natural food items as much as humanly possible.

Oh, but that stuff is just way too expensive and I can't afford it!

I hear that a lot and it's utter nonsense! That's a myth based on a skewed, inside-the-box belief system. My question is: Can you afford the growing list of ailments and serious dis-eases that are now plaguing virtually all industrialized societies many of which have been directly linked to a consistent diet of garbage?? The chemicals and over-processing that go into the bilge being passed off as food is a lot like continuous exposure to low-level radiation. It doesn't seem to have much of a noticeable effect on the body at first, but it's cumulative. So, over time it adds up until a critical threshold is finally reached. Then it's: Boy, am I ever glad I had that "health" insurance! Or: Oh, man - I wish I would've had "health" insurance!

Either way, if you're buying into that sort of mind-set then you are a willing slave to the system.

Let's examine this so-called "health" insurance briefly. First of all, the name is inaccurate. It isn't health insurance at all. It's disease insurance! Most folks have it - many don't. What I'm wondering is, why do those who have it, have it, and why do those who don't, covet it? The main reason is because they've been brainwashed into thinking that it is an indispensable part of life and that they'll surely need it at some point down the road. And as many already know, what you put our attention on is what expands in your reality. In other words, if you go through life assuming a defensive posture, then you will almost certainly attract a situation wherein you will be required to defend yourself. Changing that paradigm only requires a simple shift in perception. Instead of investing energy and resources defending one's self against dis-ease, simply embrace wellness. For when you fight against a thing, you energetically tie yourself to that thing.

So, I say dump the insurance - it's a scam! Insurance of any kind is a relatively recent phenomena in  human experience, and didn't begin cropping up until our over-all quality of life began seriously deteriorating. In case you haven't noticed, insurance companies (most notably "health" insurance) and big business (most notably allopathic "medicine"/big pharma) are the coziest of bedfellows! Ever wonder why?

Take charge of your life! Stop giving exorbitant amounts of your hard-earned money to those vultures and instead, use it to feed and take care of yourself properly. Grow as much of your own food as you can or have the ability to. Join a co-op where you can exchange some of what you have for some of what you don't have. They're all over the place. If there isn't one near you, get together with other like-minded individuals and start one. Create community gardens!

Simplify your life! The less you have to "juggle" the more you can live "in your ease."

Dump the cable/satellite TV! There's nothing of value there, peeps, only mind-numbing propaganda and social conditioning. Why do so many feel the need for both that and an internet connection? Believe me, when you disengage yourself from the tube, the withdrawal only lasts for a couple weeks in most cases. And after a few months you'll probably wonder how the hell you were ever able to tolerate any of it in the first place! It's an addiction similar to eating carbohydrates - the more you eat, the more you want. In fact, I'm convinced that carbs are the primary reason for the epidemic incidence of obesity as well as dis-ease in this country. You know that "food pyramid" pictured on nearly all boxes of processed carbohydrates? It's a blatant lie. It represents the exact opposite what nutritionists all know to be healthy. So instead of grain being the least important part of even a moderately healthy diet, it's promoted as being the most important. And don't think for a moment that's an accident. Incidentally, if you're buying your food in a cardboard box, you'd be far better off eating the box than the swill that's in it. If you're not in the habit of reading labels I would urge you to educate yourself on what to watch out for and then implement that knowledge.

Every single one of us here has a computer with a working browser. Put it to use, if you're not already, and do your own research. I am amazed, however, at how many people don't really know how to even go about that. And for that, you can mostly thank our illustrious "education" (read social indoctrination) system where teaching day to day problem-solving skills is completely left out of the curriculum. Of course, this helps breed more and more dependence on outside authority so it's not at all surprising.

Let's see... someone mentioned that their cell phone was crucial for their business, but I'm having a hard time buying that. I was sole owner and operator of a very successful business for 7 years and never once considered the need for that brain-frying technology. I always liked the idea of me running my business rather than my business running me!:lol: I think Lyra really nailed the topic of cell phones down with her observations and assessment. As with so much of our current technology we must ask ourselves: is this really adding to my convenience or to my enslavement?

Ultimately, if autonomy, vibrant health and well-being are important enough to you, then you will figure out a way to make it so. But if you feel that's it's just too overwhelming or simply not possible, then you are, in fact, choosing to be a slave to the system.

All in all, this section of NR seems to be off to a great start and I think it has great potential for blossoming into a veritable cornucopia of alternative living ideas!:)

Re: Little Things that Make a Difference

Great tips above, people!

Speaking strictly in the monetary sense here:

- Coupons are usually gimmicks which promote big-name brands, and/or brands which are usually priced high to begin with.  Compare the final price after the coupon to the price of generic.  If the coupon still saves you money, by all means, use it.

- (again, strictly monetary here) Cellphones may actually save money compared to land-lines, especially if a large portion of your monthly calls would be considered "long-distance" from a land-line.  Alternatively, if you have broadband, you could consider a plan such as Vonage, which offers unlimited long distance for something around $20/month.  However in my experience their Customer Service *sucks*.   But then, so do most phone companies!

- If you have a heat-pump with a low-speed "fan" setting, try leaving it in fan mode.  This keeps the air circulating at a low speed, keeping temps even throughout the house, and can reduce the amount of time per day the outdoor unit needs to turn on.  You should notice in a day or two whether it's running less or not.  This works for me in both summer and winter.  Results will vary with each home, of course.

- Just adjusting your driving patterns can help a bunch.  do you need to accelerate this fast?  who really cares if the guy behind you is riding your bumper and cursing?  Do you need to hit the brakes so often, etc.  Simply being more passive on the accelerator/brakes can add up to dollars in your pocket.  note: this is not an excuse to mow down pedestrians wink

This is no time for the righteous
Only the wicked survive
Bake up a batch of the Yellow Cake
Bake up a batch of the lies
- - - - -[ Yellow Cake - Ministry - Rio Grande Blood (2006)

Re: Little Things that Make a Difference

I would recommend a multi solid fuel or wood burning stove for both heating and hot water, the cost of electricity and household gas is going to rise and rise and you are at the mercy of these utility companies.
Free wood is everwhere if you look for it and you can even turn newspapers in to brick logs to burn.

Also how about small wind turbines that you could put in the backyard to charge battery packs to run house lights or similar.

Its not like we are fractions of the whole but rather versions of the whole.

Re: Little Things that Make a Difference

BlueSojourn wrote:

Let's see... someone mentioned that their cell phone was crucial for their business, but I'm having a hard time buying that. I was sole owner and operator of a very successful business for 7 years and never once considered the need for that brain-frying technology. I always liked the idea of me running my business rather than my business running me!:lol: I think Lyra really nailed the topic of cell phones down with her observations and assessment. As with so much of our current technology we must ask ourselves: is this really adding to my convenience or to my enslavement?

I was the person who stated how crucial a cell phone is in my business.  I am glad for you since you don't have one but don't be so quick in judging my statement.  without my customers my business is just another statistic in bankruptcy court.  I have to  be in several places in a given day and I have to be available to each one of my customers or they may say bye-bye.   It is just the way things are in this business.  I don't necesarily like it but I have two kids, a wife, two cats and others that depend on me.  I would not mind not having a job and getting rid of my cell phone but I got bills to pay.  Until I resolve the bills & dependants issue I'll have to carry that phone.............whether I like it or not!   PERIOD!   I am making changes in my life to detach myself from some of these chains but evidently I am not doing a job as good as you are.  I am basically a baby taking his/hers first steps towards freeing myself from the matrix and I am not ashamed of saying so.   

By the way, I started reading The 4 Agreements by Miguel Ruiz (Thanks Soloflecks: I bought the book last night and I am almost done with it........Great reading!) and I really think it would do you a lot of good if you read it too.  I wish you well friend.......

Regards

Re: Little Things that Make a Difference

"why", I gotta agree with you there.  As much as I *hate* cellphones, I wouldn't be able to make what little bit of money I do make, without one.  My business would be a complete flop.  Plus, that thing came in mighty handy recently when I had an accident.  Saved me probably a hundred smackers or more for a tow-bill just by being able to call someone I knew.  How many hours would I have sat there waiting for help otherwise?  Nobody stops for strangers these days!

Anyway.. I hate cells... but unfortunately, at least for now, they are a necessary evil in my life.  It'll probably be one of the last things I disconnect -- although, I *will* disconnect it eventually!!!

This is no time for the righteous
Only the wicked survive
Bake up a batch of the Yellow Cake
Bake up a batch of the lies
- - - - -[ Yellow Cake - Ministry - Rio Grande Blood (2006)

21 (edited by lyra 2005-12-10 22:31:14)

Re: Little Things that Make a Difference

Bolded words my own emphasis:


BlueSojourn wrote:

I have a couple observations and suggestions I'd like to toss into the mix here, if I may.

Walking the walk, first and foremost, usually (though, not necessarily) means learning to think and live "outside of the box."  Yet a few of the well-intended suggestions......are more akin to merely rearranging the furniture.

For instance, there's a suggestion to shop with coupons and select items offering rebates to save money. Okay - on the surface, that might seem like a good idea, but is it really? Think about it. Have you ever seen anything (food-wise) being offered on a coupon that you actually feel good about putting into your body?  Fact is, it's always some sort of chemical-laden over-processed garbage that, in addition to being something you really don't need in the first place,  should be avoided at all cost. And who offers these enticements, anyway? Yeah, that's right - the big conglomerate "food" (and I use that term very loosely) factories and their bought-and-paid-for outlets. Are the small "mom and pop" markets really any better? Yeah, sometimes. But many if not most of them get their inventory from pretty much the same distributors that the big chains do. They just don't get the same wholesale rate, and so aren't able to compete and are eventually forced out of business.

A solution? Avoid supermarkets and buy organic, or at the very least, natural food items as much as humanly possible.

Oh, but that stuff is just way too expensive and I can't afford it!

I hear that a lot and it's utter nonsense! That's a myth based on a skewed, inside-the-box belief system. My question is: Can you afford the growing list of ailments and serious dis-eases that are now plaguing virtually all industrialized societies many of which have been directly linked to a consistent diet of garbage?? The chemicals and over-processing that go into the bilge being passed off as food is a lot like continuous exposure to low-level radiation. It doesn't seem to have much of a noticeable effect on the body at first, but it's cumulative. So, over time it adds up until a critical threshold is finally reached.

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Seriously, you read my mind.  It's eery almost.  wink  Like you, I also realize that the list is well intentioned, but I was thinking the EXACT SAME THING, almost word for word.....clipping coupons may save money, but it's always coupons for food / products I would never buy in a million years!!!!   

I shop at Whole Foods, and buy all organic.   And yes, it costs more, but it's healthier food and well worth the extra $$.  There are skeptics out there regarding organic food, but I don't care.  I still buy it.  big_smile   It's worth it to pay an extra dollar or two for organic veggies than to get the ones coated in pesticides.   Same goes for the extra several dollars per pound spent on hormone/antibiotic-free meat and dairy products, versus the regular supermarket stuff.

"Trust" is a big factor when it comes to organic food, so I'm placing a lot of trust in these products.   But I don't get sick, and the people around me out in the world do, and quite frequently, so, I must be doing something right. 

And yes, I agree with you about health insurance being a scam....we have the ability to mentally will ourselves to health and to mentally will away ailments.   I've done it, several times, curing bladder infections, tooth/jaw issues, etc., because I had no money, no insurance, and no choice, so there was nothing to lose in giving it a shot.   And it WORKS.   Not to sound corny, but all you have to do is truly believe it will work, and be in that desperate mindset.   Whenever I become eligible for "the company's health insurance" at whatever job I'm at, it always gets turned down.  No thanks.  It's bad enough the IRS legally steals a quarter of my earnings....you think I'm going to throw even MORE of it away when I can just eat healthy as a preventive measure, and mentally will away whatever issues I have going on?  (or take herbal supplements and cure myself?)   I don't think so!  Doctors schmoctors!   big_smile

Anyway, I digress.  Not trying to sidetrack things, just had to comment on this.....

"Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting "Holy shit ... what a ride!"  - Anonymous
-----
"I get by with a little help from my (higher density) friends."
-----

Re: Little Things that Make a Difference

lyra wrote:

Doctors schmoctors!   big_smile

Hey now!  A good naturopath can guide you through all the hype and nonsense when it comes to alternative medicine, and save you a bundle on your car insurance!

(OK not so much on your car insurance)

It is not for us to understand love, but simply to make space for it.

Re: Little Things that Make a Difference

BlueSojourn wrote:

Avoid supermarkets and buy organic

Keep in mind, there are plenty of things wrong with food that contains and markets its ingredients as 'organic'.  I buy organic too, more and more... but the biggest thing you want to avoid is sugar. 

Sugar is put in really everything, the organic sector is no different (unless we're talking produce).  It really affects our mind/body/spirit and makes us age.  They have all funny names for it now...  (IE I'm pretty sure 'evaporated cane juice' is generally something your body would do better without...).

So it is wise to buy organic, but just take a second look at the ingredients. cool

"The unknown does not incite fear, but dependence on the known does." - J. Krishnamurti

Re: Little Things that Make a Difference

I just gotta throw a couple pennies on the subject of food.

Food is fuel, and yes, cleaner fuel burns with less waste produce.  I'm not bashing organic food in any way.

But also consider that a really hot fire will burn anything in its path. .

It is not for us to understand love, but simply to make space for it.

Re: Little Things that Make a Difference

RE: Organic Food -- I've eaten only organic food since 1981 - except for restaurants and vacations.  I've had the flu three times, never been hospitilized and am, thank goodness, very healthy -- and I'm at least twice the age of many on NR --

That said -- organic is more expensive by far - I live alone so only have me to feed.  For a family this would make a large increase in budget.

SO, in keeping with the title of this thread -- little things that make a difference --

Start by eliminating the WORST (in my opinion) vegetables that are almost 100% genetically engineered -- potatoes (including potatoe chips), and soy. 

Buy organic potatoes and soy.

Next buy organic milk and milk products.  This IS very expensive relative to regular milk (cheese) but believe me if you had a clue what goes into regular milk you would run screaming.  I owned a diary farm in the 80's and it's not a pretty thing <g>

To find money to start buying more and more organically -- look around.  What might you eat/drink/smoke that is costly and not VITAL.  (hint here -- pot? beer? cigs?) -- or maybe costly cable package?

As for the controversies about organic -- true, now organic food can have some additives -- approximately 38 are approved VERSUS about 3,000 additives in "regular" food.  "Not everything organic is good for you" -- true, a steady diet of organic chocolate chip cookies WILL make you gain weight and is not balanced so it's really a question of just being sane and learning more and more.  I eat almost no meat but when I do, for SURE it's organically raised.

It's a question of priorities -- organic versus cigarettes?  organic versus cable?  Etc.  I seriously doubt that anyone on this board could not afford organic if there was a willingness to give up a thing or three.

26

Re: Little Things that Make a Difference

Risen wrote:

"why", I gotta agree with you there.  As much as I *hate* cellphones, I wouldn't be able to make what little bit of money I do make, without one.  My business would be a complete flop.  Plus, that thing came in mighty handy recently when I had an accident.  Saved me probably a hundred smackers or more for a tow-bill just by being able to call someone I knew.  How many hours would I have sat there waiting for help otherwise?  Nobody stops for strangers these days!

Anyway.. I hate cells... but unfortunately, at least for now, they are a necessary evil in my life.  It'll probably be one of the last things I disconnect -- although, I *will* disconnect it eventually!!!

I edited an article about cell phones recently and learned there are devices you can use to cut down on the radiation that cell phones emit.  Here's that info, from the article  by Professor John W. Henao of the Health Science Institute, Kyoto, Japan: 

Although I personally don't use a cellular phone and I haven't fallen into the social temptation of using one, my common sense suggestion to users of this intrusive, noisy, extremely addictive and only sometimes convenient device, is: If you want to use a cellular phone, whenever you receive or make a call, use a protective device to deflect and absorb the radiation that would otherwise come straight out from the phone into your ear, brain and eyes. I recommend in order of efficacy the WaveShield RF 4001 headset (it reportedly absorbs almost 100% of radiation), the Cell/Wave Guard (it reportedly absorbs up to 61% of radiation), or a simple earphone which according to the last research deflects radiation without absorbing it.

My son just started using a cell phone, this reminds me that I need to talk to him about this.  I've never used one myself but I can understand their convenience.

Re: Little Things that Make a Difference

A little thing that makes a big difference: Bulk Fiber.

You can't change a tiger's stripes,
but you can avoid its teeth.

Re: Little Things that Make a Difference

Hehe, that last post was a thread-killer.  But there were some really good ideas in this thread so I *refuse* to let it die.

Some of you mentioned eating organic, and I have some questions about this.  I recently heard that the definition of "organic" food was recently changed by the FDA (or whatever), and foods now only need to be like 25% organic to be have that label!?  Is there any truth to this?  And there was something about preference to the label "chemical free" as being the new label for what Organic was supposed to mean?

Oils:  I recently read that one should only consume cold-pressed oils (vegetable,etc) and they should *always* be refrigerated.  In other words heat should never touch them.  Any diet experts know the scoop on this?  I for one use the cheap crap and never knew to keep it in the fridge.  But perhaps I'll change this after what I read!

Barefoot mentioned wood-stoves, and this is an awesome suggestion for anyone who can.  Unfortunately I can't stand the smell of it, I get sick if I get anywhere near it.  And coal supposedly is high in lead?  Are there any other natural heating options that I'm not thinking of?

This is no time for the righteous
Only the wicked survive
Bake up a batch of the Yellow Cake
Bake up a batch of the lies
- - - - -[ Yellow Cake - Ministry - Rio Grande Blood (2006)

Re: Little Things that Make a Difference

Risen wrote:

Barefoot mentioned wood-stoves, and this is an awesome suggestion for anyone who can.  Unfortunately I can't stand the smell of it, I get sick if I get anywhere near it.  And coal supposedly is high in lead?  Are there any other natural heating options that I'm not thinking of?

Hi Risen There should be no smell from a correctly fitted cast iron stove or wood burner with enough chimney draught to draw the smoke up in other words when you open the stove door no smoke should come out, we have had one for 2 years in the living room and the fuel savings have more than paid for it. I only have a 4kw back boiler but its enough to do the hot water.

Its not like we are fractions of the whole but rather versions of the whole.